RAPID MOC

 

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Overview

 

Instrumentation

Intro | Florida Current | Western boundary | US buoy | Eastern boundary | Archive

Telemetry system

Intro | United Kingdom | United States

Data

Intro | Florida Current | Western boundary | US buoy | Eastern boundary | Archive | Time series

Restricted access — project participants only

Intro | Western boundary | US buoy | Eastern boundary | Archive | Data download

     Real time data of the RAPID MOC monitoring array at 26.5°N

Overview

Schematic of the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.
© Schematic of the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

As part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) programme we are developing a telemetry system. The aim of the system is to transmit near real time data from key moorings, deployed as part of a monitoring array to measure the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. For further information on the monitoring array visit the RAPID MOC project pages.

Instruments on the moorings record temperature, conductivity, pressure, and current speed and direction. These data are in turn collected by the surface telemetry buoy through inductive connections with the moored instruments. The telemetry buoy transmits the data via an Iridium satellite system back to the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS).

This web site displays real time data received from two key moorings of the array along with data received from a second telemetry system designed and deployed by researchers at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS).

Data are also shown from measurements of the Florida Current Transport Project, which is operated by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami (AOML).

Additional data

Real time data from Argo floats have also been obtained as part of the RAPID MOC project. Data from these floats may be viewed under the 'Fieldwork > Data' section of the RAPID MOC web site.

In September 2008 an autonomous underwater gilder was deployed in the Eastern Boundary region as part of the RAPID-WATCH system for monitoring the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The aim is to assess its contribution to the monitoring array in comparison to the moored instruments.

The Glider data are transmitted to NOCS in real time via Iridium satellite communications. More information about the glider and access to data plots is available from the Glider project pages at NOCS.

 
Visit the official RAPID web site
Visit the official RAPID MOC web site