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Metadata Report for BODC Series Reference Number 1850943


Metadata Summary

Data Description

Data Category Meteorology -unspecified
Instrument Type
NameCategories
Vaisala HMP temperature and humidity sensor  meteorological packages
Gill Windsonic anemometer  anemometers
Kipp and Zonen CM6B pyranometer  radiometers
Skye Instruments SKE510 PAR energy sensor  radiometers
Vaisala PTB110 barometer  meteorological packages
Instrument Mounting research vessel
Originating Country United Kingdom
Originator Unknown
Originating Organization British Oceanographic Data Centre, Liverpool
Processing Status banked
Online delivery of data Download available - Ocean Data View (ODV) format
Project(s) Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB)
SSB CaNDyFloSS
 

Data Identifiers

Originator's Identifier JC105_PROD_MET
BODC Series Reference 1850943
 

Time Co-ordinates(UT)

Start Time (yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm) 2014-06-15 07:32
End Time (yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm) 2014-06-23 18:14
Nominal Cycle Interval 30.0 seconds
 

Spatial Co-ordinates

Southernmost Latitude 48.11833 N ( 48° 7.1' N )
Northernmost Latitude 51.30950 N ( 51° 18.6' N )
Westernmost Longitude 9.96067 W ( 9° 57.6' W )
Easternmost Longitude 1.29200 W ( 1° 17.5' W )
Positional Uncertainty 0.0 to 0.01 n.miles
Minimum Sensor or Sampling Depth -19.4 m
Maximum Sensor or Sampling Depth -18.03 m
Minimum Sensor or Sampling Height -
Maximum Sensor or Sampling Height -
Sea Floor Depth -
Sea Floor Depth Source -
Sensor or Sampling Distribution Scattered at fixed depths - The sensors are scattered with respect to depth but each remains effectively at the same depth for the duration of the series
Sensor or Sampling Depth Datum Approximate - Depth is only approximate
Sea Floor Depth Datum -
 

Parameters

BODC CODERankUnitsTitle
AADYAA011DaysDate (time from 00:00 01/01/1760 to 00:00 UT on day)
AAFDZZ011DaysTime (time between 00:00 UT and timestamp)
ALATGP011DegreesLatitude north relative to WGS84 by unspecified GPS system
ALONGP011DegreesLongitude east relative to WGS84 by unspecified GPS system
CAPHTU011MillibarsPressure (measured variable) exerted by the atmosphere by barometer and expressed at measurement altitude
CDTASS011Degrees CelsiusTemperature of the atmosphere by dry bulb thermometer
CRELSS011PercentRelative humidity of the atmosphere by humidity sensor
CSLRR1XS1Watts per square metreDownwelling vector irradiance as energy of electromagnetic radiation (solar (300-3000nm) wavelengths) in the atmosphere by pyranometer and taking the maximum value from two or more sensors
DWIRRXMX1Watts per square metreDownwelling vector irradiance as energy of electromagnetic radiation (PAR wavelengths) in the atmosphere by cosine-collector radiometer and taking the maximum value from two or more sensors
EWDASS011Degrees TrueDirection (from) of wind relative to True North {wind direction} in the atmosphere by in-situ anemometer
EWSBSS011Metres per secondSpeed of wind {wind speed} in the atmosphere by in-situ anemometer

Definition of Rank

  • Rank 1 is a one-dimensional parameter
  • Rank 2 is a two-dimensional parameter
  • Rank 0 is a one-dimensional parameter describing the second dimension of a two-dimensional parameter (e.g. bin depths for moored ADCP data)

Problem Reports

No Problem Report Found in the Database

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry RRS James Cook Cruise JC105 underway meteorology quality control report

Quality control report

Wind sensors

Wind direction data were flagged where data was considered anomalous and not related with a change in ship's heading.

Wind sensors and air temperature

Wind and air temperature were flagged where the relative wind direction was ~180 ° to the bow. At these times, there appeared to be a reduction in wind speed, an effect on wind direction and an increase in air temperature. It was thought these were caused by masking from the ship's superstructure.

Light sensors

Both PAR and TIR sensors exhibited negative readings in the dark. This phenomena is known to be caused by radiation loss at night. Night time negative values were flagged suspect to preserve the data value. (BODC assessment)


Data Access Policy

Open Data supplied by Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)

You must always use the following attribution statement to acknowledge the source of the information: "Contains data supplied by Natural Environment Research Council."


Narrative Documents

Gill Instruments Windsonic Anemometer

The Gill Windsonic is a 2-axis ultrasonic wind sensor that monitors wind speed and direction using four transducers. The time taken for an ultrasonic pulse to travel from the North to the South transducers is measured and compared with the time for a pulse to travel from South to North. Travel times between the East and West transducers are similarly compared. The wind speed and direction are calculated from the differences in the times of flight along each axis. This calculation is independent of environmental factors such as temperature.

Specifications

Ultrasonic output rate 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 Hz
Operating Temperature -35 to 70°C
Operating Humidity < 5 to 100% RH
Anemometer start up time < 5 s
Wind speed
Range 0 to 60 m s-1
Accuracy ± 2% at 2 m s-1
Resolution 0.01 m s-1
Response time 0.25 s
Threshold 0.01 m s-1
Wind direction
Range 0 to 359°
Accuracy ± 3° at 12 m s-1
Resolution
Response time 0.25 s

Further details can be found in the manufacturer's specification sheet.

Kipp and Zonen Pyranometer Model CM6B

The CM6B pyranometer is intended for routine global solar radiation measurement research on a level surface. The CM6B features a sixty-four thermocouple junction (series connected) sensing element. The sensing element is coated with a highly stable carbon based non-organic coating, which delivers excellent spectral absorption and long term stability characteristics. The sensing element is housed under two concentric fitting Schott K5 glass domes.

Specifications

Dimensions (W x H) 150.0 mm x 91.5 mm
Weight 850 grams
Operating Temperature -40°C to +80°C
Spectral Range 305 - 2800 nm
(50% points)
Sensitivity 9 -15 µV/W/m2
Impedance (nominal) 70 - 100 ohm
Response Time (95%) 30 sec
Non-linearity < ± 1.2% (<1000 W/m2)
Temperature dependence of sensitivity < ± 2% (-10 to +40°C)
Zero-offset due to temperature changes < ± 4 W/m2 at 5 K/h temperature change

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry RRS James Cook Cruise JC105 underway meteorology instrumentation

Instrumentation

The meteorological suite of sensors were located on the foremast, approximately 17.1 m above sea level. The anemometer orientation was 0° on the bow.

Manufacturer Model Serial number Last manufacturer's calibration date Comments
Skye PAR 38884 13/08/2012 Starboard
Skye PAR 28561 04/07/2013 Port
Kipp and Zonen TIR 994132 10/07/2012 Port
Kipp and Zonen TIR 994133 10/07/2012 Starboard
Gill Windsonic 064537 - No calibration required
Vaisala PTB110 J0710002 03/03/2014 Offset applied at calibration laboratory
Vaisala HMP45 B4950010 06/07/2013 -
BODC image

Skye Instruments PAR Energy Sensor Model SKE 510

The SKE 510 is suitable for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) from natural or artificial light sources. The sensor is fully waterproof and guaranteed submersible to 4m depth, and indoor versions are also available.

The instrument uses a blue-enhanced planar diffused silicon detector to measure energy (in W m-2) over the 400-700 nm waveband. It has a cosine-corrected head and a square spectral response. The sensor can operate over a temperature range of -35 to 70 °C and a humidity range of 0-100% RH.

Specifications

Sensitivity (current) 1.5µA or 100 W m-2
Sensitivity (voltage) 1mV or 100 W m-2
Working Range 0-5000 W m-2
Linearity error 0.2%
Absolute calibration error typ. less than 3%
5% max
Response time - voltage output 10 ns
Cosine error 3%
Azimuth error less than 1%
Temperature co-efficient ±0.1% per °C
Internal resistance - voltage output c. 300 ohms
Longterm stability ±2%
Material Dupont 'Delrin'
Dimensions 34 mm diameter
38mm height
Cable 2 core screened
7 - 2 - 2C
Sensor Passband 400 - 700 nm
Detector Silicon photocell
Filters Glass type and/or metal interference

Vaisala PTB110 barometer

An industrial, analog barometer which uses a silicon capacitive sensor (BAROCAP). The sensor produces either frequency or voltage output and is mountable on a (35 mm wide) DIN rail.

Operating ranges (1 hPa = 1 mbar)

Pressure ranges 500 ... 1100 hPa
600 ... 1100 hPa
800 ... 1100 hPa
800 ... 1060 hPa
600 ... 1060 hPa
Temperature range -40 ... +60 °C (-40 ... +140 °F)
Humidity range non-condensing

General

Output voltage 0 ... 2.5 VDC
0 ... 5 VDC
Output frequency 500 ... 1100 Hz
Resolution 0.1 hPa

Accuracy

Linearity* ±0.25 hPa
Hysteresis* ±0.03 hPa
Repeatability* ±0.03 hPa
Pressure calibration uncertainty** ±0.15 hPa
Accuracy at +20 °C*** ±0.3 hPa
Total accuracy at:
+15 ... +25 °C (+59 ... +77 °F)
0 ... +40 °C (+32 ... +104 °F)
-20 ... +45 °C (-4 ... +113 °F)
-40 ... +60 °C (-40 ... +140 °F)
±0.3 hPa
±0.6 hPa
±1.0 hPa
±1.5 hPa

* Defined as ±2 standard deviation limits of end-point non-linearity, hysteresis error or repeatability error.
** Defined as ±2 standard deviation limits of inaccuracy of the working standard including traceability to NIST.
*** Defined as the root sum of the squares (RSS) of end-point non-linearity, hysteresis error, repeatability error and calibration uncertainty at room temperature when using voltage output.

More detailed information can be found in the manufacturer's data sheet and user's guide.

Vaisala Temperature and Relative Humidity HMP Sensors

A family of sensors and instruments (sensors plus integral displays or loggers) for the measurement of air temperature and relative humidity. All are based on a probe containing a patent (HUMICAP) capacitive thin polymer film capacitanece humidity sensor and a Pt100 platinum resistance thermometer. The probes are available with a wide range of packaging, cabling and interface options all of which have designations of the form HMPnn or HMPnnn such as HMP45 and HMP230. Vaisala sensors are incorporated into weather stations and marketed by Campbell Scientific.

All versions operate at up to 100% humidity. Operating temperature ranges vary between models, allowing users to select the version best suited to their requirements.

Further details can be found in the manufacturer's specification sheets for the HMP 45 series, HMP 70 series and HMP 230 series.

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry RRS James Cook Cruise JC105 underway meteorology data processing procedures

Data Processing Procedures

Originator's Data Processing

All underway sensors/instruments were initially logged via the Ifremer TECHSAS (TECHnical and Scientific sensors Acquisition System) system. The data were then broadcast in UDP/IP frames via the on-board LAN. Data were broadcast in two formats: NMEA broadcasting format and XML broadcasting format. The XML broadcast was used to create TECHSAS NetCDF files while the NMEA broadcast was used to transfer data to the RVS Level-C UNIX system where it was parsed into RVS data streams (RVS format files). Data were further processed in Level-C as described below:

Files delivered to BODC

Filename Content description Format Interval Start date/time (UTC) End date/time (UTC) Comments
surfmet raw meteorology data RVS 1 Hz 15/06/2014 07:31:28 23/06/2014 18:14:15 all raw meteorology data (including relative wind speed and direction)
pro_wind absolute wind speed and direction RVS 10 secs 15/06/2014 07:32:00 23/06/2014 18:13:50 absolute wind speed and direction

BODC Data Processing

The file surfmet was selected for transfer into BODC format since it contained all meteorological data available. The data included in prowind were not transferred, as absolute wind and direction was derived from the relative data sent in the surfmet file. The data were reformatted to NetCDF using BODC standard data banking procedures. The following table shows how variables within the file were mapped to appropriate BODC parameter codes:

surfmet
Originator's variable Originator's units Description BODC Code BODC Units Unit conversion Comments
temp_h degrees C TSG housing temperature        
temp_r degrees C Sea surface temperature        
cond S/m Conductivity        
fluo volts Instrument output from fluorometer        
trans volts Instrument output from transmissometer        
speed m/s Relative wind speed ERWSSS01 m/s    
direct degrees Relative wind direction ERWDSS01 degrees   0° on the bow
airtemp degrees C Air temperature CDTASS01 degrees C    
humidity % Relative humidity CRELSS01 %    
press hPa Air pressure CAPHTU01 mbar 1 hPa = 1 mbar  
ppar volt x 105 Instrument output from PAR sensor (port) DVLTRPSD volts x 10-5  
spar volt x 105 Instrument output from PAR sensor (starboard) DVLTRSSD volts x 10-5  
ptir volt x 105 Instrument output from TIR sensor (port) CVLTRP01 volts x 10-5  
stir volt x 105 Instrument output from TIR sensor (starboard) CVLTRS01 volts x 10-5  

All data expressed at measurement altitude.

All the reformatted data were visualised using the in-house EDSERPLO software. Suspect data were marked by adding an appropriate quality control flag, missing data by both setting the data to an appropriate value and setting the quality control flag.

Absolute wind speed and direction

Relative wind speed and direction were corrected for the ship's heading and speed using the POS MV gyro heading, ship velocities (calculated at BODC from the main positional channels) and an anemometer orientation of 0° on the bow.

PAR and TIR

The following manufacturer's calibrations were applied to the PAR and TIR light sensors using:

y (W m-2) = (a x 10 6)/b

where 'a' is the raw data in volts and 'b' is the calibration offset (µV per W m-2) as shown below.

Sensor Serial no location offset
(µV per W m-2)
PAR 28561 port 9.81
PAR 38884 starboard 9.53
TIR 994133 port 9.67
TIR 994132 starboard 11.41

Subsequently, the maximum value of the port-side and starboard-side sensor pairs were extracted into a new data channels in order to eliminate the effects of shading.

Air pressure

A manufacturer's calibration was not applied to the barometer because there was no significant offset reported on the certified calibration certificate.

Air temperature and humidity

Manufacturer's calibrations were not applied to the temperature and humidity probe because there were no significant offsets reported on the certified calibration certificate.

Field Calibration

No field calibrations were applied at BODC.


Project Information

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) Programme

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) is a £10.5 million, six-year (2011-2017) research programme, jointly funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). The aim of the research is to reduce the uncertainty in our understanding of nutrient and carbon cycling within the shelf seas, and of their role in global biogeochemical cycles. SSB will also provide effective policy advice and make a significant contribution to the Living with Environmental Change programme.

Background

The Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry research programme directly relates to the delivery of the NERC Earth system science theme and aims to provide evidence that supports a number of marine policy areas and statutory requirements, such as the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and Marine and Climate Acts.

The shelf seas are highly productive compared to the open ocean, a productivity that underpins more than 90 per cent of global fisheries. Their importance to society extends beyond food production to include issues of biodiversity, carbon cycling and storage, waste disposal, nutrient cycling, recreation and renewable energy resources.

The shelf seas have been estimated to be the most valuable biome on Earth, but they are under considerable stress, as a result of anthropogenic nutrient loading, overfishing, habitat disturbance, climate change and other impacts.

However, even within the relatively well-studied European shelf seas, fundamental biogeochemical processes are poorly understood. For example: the role of shelf seas in carbon storage; in the global cycles of key nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, silicon and iron); and in determining primary and secondary production, and thereby underpinning the future delivery of many other ecosystem services.

Improved knowledge of such factors is not only required by marine policymakers; it also has the potential to increase the quality and cost-effectiveness of management decisions at the local, national and international levels under conditions of climate change.

The Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry research programme will take a holistic approach to the cycling of nutrients and carbon and the controls on primary and secondary production in UK and European shelf seas, to increase understanding of these processes and their role in wider biogeochemical cycles. It will thereby significantly improve predictive marine biogeochemical and ecosystem models over a range of scales.

The scope of the programme includes exchanges with the open ocean (transport on and off the shelf to a depth of around 500m), together with cycling, storage and release processes on the shelf slope, and air-sea exchange of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide).

Further details are available on the SSB website.

Participants

15 different organisations are directly involved in research for SSB. These institutions are

  • Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas)
  • Meteorological Office
  • National Oceanography Centre (NOC)
  • Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML)
  • Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) / Scottish Marine Institute (SMI)
  • University of Aberdeen
  • University of Bangor
  • University of East Anglia (UEA)
  • University of Edinburgh
  • University of Essex
  • University of Liverpool
  • University of Oxford
  • Plymouth University
  • University of Portsmouth
  • University of Southampton

In addition, there are third party institutions carrying out sampling work for SSB, but who are not involved in the programme itself. These are:

  • The Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI)
  • Irish Marine Institute (MI)
  • Marine Science Scotland (MSS)

Research details

Overall, five Work Packages have been funded by the SSB programme. These are described in brief below:

  • Work Package 1: Carbon and Nutrient Dynamics and Fluxes over Shelf Systems (CaNDyFloSS).
    This work package aims to perform a comprehensive study of the cycling of nutrients and carbon throughout the water column over the whole north-west European shelf. This will allow the fluxes of nutrients and carbon between the shelf and the deep ocean and atmosphere to be quantified, establishing the role of the north-west European continental shelf in the global carbon cycle.

  • Work Package 2: Biogeochemistry, macronutrient and carbon cycling in the benthic layer.
    This work package aims are to map the sensitivity and status of seabed habitats, based on physical conditions, ecological community structure and the size and dynamics of the nitrogen and carbon pools found there. This information will be used, in conjunction with some laboratory-based work, to generate an understanding of the potential impacts on the benthic community as a result of changing environmental conditions, such as rising CO2 levels.

  • Work Package 3: The supply of iron from shelf sediments to the ocean.
    The research for this work package addresses the question of how currents, tides, weather and marine chemistry allow new iron to be transported away from the shallow shelf waters around the United Kingdom (UK), to the nearby open ocean. This will ultimately allow an improved understanding of how the transport of iron in shelf waters and shelf sediments influences phytoplankton growth in open oceans. This in turn improves the understanding of carbon dioxide uptake by phytoplankton.

  • Work Package 4: Integrative modelling for Shelf Seas Biogeochemistry.
    The aim of this work package is the development of a new shelf seas biogeochemical model system, coupled to a state of the art physical model, that is capable of predicting regional impacts of environmental change of timescales from days to decades. It is envisaged that the combination of predictive tools and new knowledge developed in this work package will underpin development and implementation of marine policy and marine forecasting systems.

  • Work Package 5: Data synthesis and management of marine and coastal carbon (DSMMAC).
    This work package is funded by Defra and is also known by the name 'Blue Carbon'. The aim is to provide a process-based, quantitative assessment of the role of UK coastal waters and shelf seas in carbon storage and release, using existing data and understanding, and also emerging results from SSB fieldwork, experiments and modelling. Particular emphasis will be given to processes that may be influenced by human activities, and hence the opportunity for management interventions to enhance carbon sequestration.

Fieldwork and data collection

The campaign consists of the core cruises in the table below, to the marine shelf (and shelf-edge) of the Celtic Sea on board the NERC research vessels RRS Discovery and RRS James Cook. These cruises will focus on the physics and biogeochemistry of the benthic and pelagic zones of the water column, primarily around four main sampling sites in this area.

Cruise identifier Research ship Cruise dates Work packages
DY008 RRS Discovery March 2014 WP 2 and WP 3
JC105 RRS James Cook June 2014 WP 1, WP 2 and WP 3
DY026 RRS Discovery August 2014 WP1, WP 2 and WP 3
DY018 RRS Discovery November - December 2014 WP 1 and WP 3
DY021 (also known as DY008b) RRS Discovery March 2015 WP 2 and WP 3
DY029 RRS Discovery April 2015 WP 1 and WP 3
DY030 RRS Discovery May 2015 WP 2 and WP 3
DY033 RRS Discovery July 2015 WP 1 and WP 3
DY034 RRS Discovery August 2015 WP 2 and WP 3

Core cruises will be supplemented by partner cruises led by Cefas, MI, MSS, Bangor University and AFBI, spanning the shelf seas and shelf-edges around United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland.

Activities will include coring, Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) deployments, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) surveys, moorings and wire-walker deployments, benthic lander observatories, autonomous gliders and submersible surveys, Marine Snow Catcher particulate matter analysis, plankton net hauls, in-situ sediment flume investigations and laboratory incubations with core and sea water samples.


Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) Programme Work Package 1: CaNDyFloSS

Carbon and Nutrient Dynamics and Fluxes over Shelf Systems (CaNDyFloSS) is a £2.76 million component of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) research programme, running from 2013 to 2017. It is jointly funded by NERC and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). The aim of the research is to perform a comprehensive study of the cycling of nutrients and carbon throughout the water column over the whole north-west European shelf. This will allow the fluxes of nutrients and carbon between the shelf and the deep ocean and atmosphere to be quantified, establishing the role of the north-west European continental shelf in the global carbon cycle.

Background

Shelf seas are the primary regions of human marine resource exploitation, including both renewable and fossil fuel energy sources, recreation, trade and food production. They provide 90% of global fish catches which form an important source of food to much of the global population. They also play an important role in the ecosystem services provided by the oceans as a whole, in particular in storing carbon away from the atmosphere.

Physical and biochemical processes in shelf seas influence the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere and the subsequent storage of carbon in the deep ocean. Biological growth draws carbon out of the water, which is then replaced by carbon in CO2 from the atmosphere. In the shelf seas this growth is supported by terrestrial and open ocean sources of nutrients, implying intimate roles for both the terrestrial biosphere and the open ocean environment in regulating shelf sea climate services. The oceans can also be a major source or sink for other greenhouse gases, including nitrous oxide (N2O), with the shallow shelf sea thought to play a key role.

The spatial extent of the submerged continental shelves varies greatly. The NW European shelf sea is one of the largest and hence is likely to play a significant role in marine biogeochemical cycling, alongside providing a useful model for other systems. However, even in this relatively well studied region, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the principal controls on the cycling of carbon and the major nutrient elements, nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon. Consequently it is also difficult to predict how the cycling of these elements and hence the carbon removal they support may be altered by ongoing and potential future global change. This work package aims to address these uncertainties through a comprehensive study of the cycling of the major nutrients and carbon throughout the water column over the NW European shelf sea system.

Further details are available on the SSB website.

Participants

9 different organisations are directly involved in research for SSB Work Package 1. These institutions are

  • Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas)
  • National Oceanography Centre (NOC)
  • Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML)
  • Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) / Scottish Marine Institute (SMI)
  • University of Aberdeen
  • University of Bangor
  • University of East Anglia (UEA)
  • University of Liverpool
  • University of Southampton

In addition, there are third party institutions carrying out sampling work for SSB Work Package 1, but who are not involved in the programme itself. These are:

  • The Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI)
  • Irish Marine Institute (MI)
  • Marine Science Scotland (MSS)

Objectives

Two overarching objectives are defined for this Work Package.

  • Objective 1: Estimate the size of the continental shelf carbon pump over the whole north-west European shelf.
    This will consist of two principal activities. (1) Over a 12 month period, observations of air-sea CO2 fluxes will be made to provide a synoptic estimate of the magnitude of carbon update by the whole shelf system. (2) Concentrations of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphate (P) and silicate (Si) will be estimated in water flowing on and off the shelf. These estimates will be coupled to estimates of flow and dispersion along the shelf edge, through collaboration with the NERC Fluxes across Sloping Topography of the North East Atlantic (FASTNEt) programme to allow an observational estimate of the net off-shelf transport of C, N, P and Si.

  • Objective 2: Determine the relative importance of external nutrient sources and internal biogeochemical cycling in maintaining the continental shelf pump.
    Estimates of the flux of nutrients and carbon generated in Objective 1 will be used to determine the estimation of any excess of on-shelf nutrient supply, relative to that of carbon. Work Package 1 will then quantify the processes which govern internal biogeochemical cycling by measuring the uptake ratios of N, P, Si and C into phytoplankton and the element and energy balance of organic matter production by autotrophs. Potential modifications to the relative concentrations and uptake of C, N, P and Si in the thermocline and sediment food webs will also be assessed, as will the relative importance of microbial and zooplankton turnover in controlling C, N, P and Si.

Fieldwork and data collection

Data for Objective 1 will be provided using pCO2 systems aboard third party vessels and ferry boxes, along with measurements made through the FASTNEt programme and through the Work Package 1 process cruises detailed below. The third party cruises will be undertaken by Cefas, MI, MSS, University of Bangor and AFBI, spanning the shelf seas and shelf-edges around the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.

The Work Package 1 process cruises will provide data for Objective 1 and Objective 2 and are listed in the table below. The study area is the marine shelf (and shelf-edge) of the Celtic Sea. Work will be carried out on board the NERC research vessels RRS Discovery and RRS James Cook. These cruises will focus on the physics and biogeochemistry of the benthic and pelagic zones of the water column, primarily around four main sampling sites in this area.

Cruise identifier Research ship Cruise dates Work packages
JC105 RRS James Cook June 2014 WP 1, WP 2 and WP 3
DY026 RRS Discovery August 2014 WP1, WP 2 and WP 3
DY018 RRS Discovery November - December 2014 WP 1 and WP 3
DY029 RRS Discovery April 2015 WP 1 and WP 3
DY033 RRS Discovery July 2015 WP 1 and WP 3

Activities will include Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) deployments, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) surveys, moorings and wire-walker deployments, autonomous gliders and submersible surveys, Marine Snow Catcher particulate matter analysis, plankton net hauls and laboratory incubations with sea water samples.


Data Activity or Cruise Information

Cruise

Cruise Name JC105
Departure Date 2014-06-15
Arrival Date 2014-06-24
Principal Scientist(s)Jo Hopkins (National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool)
Ship RRS James Cook

Complete Cruise Metadata Report is available here


Fixed Station Information


No Fixed Station Information held for the Series


BODC Quality Control Flags

The following single character qualifying flags may be associated with one or more individual parameters with a data cycle:

Flag Description
Blank Unqualified
< Below detection limit
> In excess of quoted value
A Taxonomic flag for affinis (aff.)
B Beginning of CTD Down/Up Cast
C Taxonomic flag for confer (cf.)
D Thermometric depth
E End of CTD Down/Up Cast
G Non-taxonomic biological characteristic uncertainty
H Extrapolated value
I Taxonomic flag for single species (sp.)
K Improbable value - unknown quality control source
L Improbable value - originator's quality control
M Improbable value - BODC quality control
N Null value
O Improbable value - user quality control
P Trace/calm
Q Indeterminate
R Replacement value
S Estimated value
T Interpolated value
U Uncalibrated
W Control value
X Excessive difference

SeaDataNet Quality Control Flags

The following single character qualifying flags may be associated with one or more individual parameters with a data cycle:

Flag Description
0 no quality control
1 good value
2 probably good value
3 probably bad value
4 bad value
5 changed value
6 value below detection
7 value in excess
8 interpolated value
9 missing value
A value phenomenon uncertain
Q value below limit of quantification