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Metadata Report for BODC Series Reference Number 1905626


Metadata Summary

Data Description

Data Category Hydrography time series at depth
Instrument Type
NameCategories
Sea-Bird SBE 39 temperature recorder  water temperature sensor
Instrument Mounting subsurface mooring
Originating Country United Kingdom
Originator Dr Jo Hopkins
Originating Organization National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool
Processing Status banked
Online delivery of data Download available - Ocean Data View (ODV) format
Project(s) Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB)
 

Data Identifiers

Originator's Identifier PER6_SBE39T+PSN6761
BODC Series Reference 1905626
 

Time Co-ordinates(UT)

Start Time (yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm) 2015-05-09 14:20
End Time (yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm) 2015-08-15 12:55
Nominal Cycle Interval 300.0 seconds
 

Spatial Co-ordinates

Latitude 51.13732 N ( 51° 8.2' N )
Longitude 6.56748 W ( 6° 34.0' W )
Positional Uncertainty 0.0 to 0.01 n.miles
Minimum Sensor or Sampling Depth 10.9 m
Maximum Sensor or Sampling Depth 10.9 m
Minimum Sensor or Sampling Height 85.1 m
Maximum Sensor or Sampling Height 85.1 m
Sea Floor Depth 96.0 m
Sea Floor Depth Source SCILOG
Sensor or Sampling Distribution Fixed common depth - All sensors are grouped effectively at the same depth which is effectively fixed for the duration of the series
Sensor or Sampling Depth Datum Instantaneous - Depth measured below water line or instantaneous water body surface
Sea Floor Depth Datum Instantaneous - Depth measured below water line or instantaneous water body surface
 

Parameters

BODC CODERankUnitsTitle
AADYAA011DaysDate (time from 00:00 01/01/1760 to 00:00 UT on day)
AAFDZZ011DaysTime (time between 00:00 UT and timestamp)
ACYCAA011DimensionlessSequence number
PREXPR011DecibarsPressure (measured variable) exerted by the water body by semi-fixed in-situ pressure sensor and corrected to read zero at sea level
TEMPPR011Degrees CelsiusTemperature of the water body

Definition of Rank

  • Rank 1 is a one-dimensional parameter
  • Rank 2 is a two-dimensional parameter
  • Rank 0 is a one-dimensional parameter describing the second dimension of a two-dimensional parameter (e.g. bin depths for moored ADCP data)

Problem Reports

No Problem Report Found in the Database


Data Access Policy

Open Data supplied by Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)

You must always use the following attribution statement to acknowledge the source of the information: "Contains data supplied by Natural Environment Research Council."


Narrative Documents

SeaBird SBE 39 Temperature Recorder

The SBE 39 is a high-accuracy temperature recorder (pressure optional) with internal battery and non-volatile memory for deployment at depths up to 10500 meters. The SBE 39 is intended for moorings or other long-term, fixed-site applications, as well as shorter-term deployments on nets, towed vehicles or ROVs. Calibration coefficients stored in EEPROM allow the SBE 39 to transmit data in engineering units. The SBE 39's thermistor has a long history of exceptional accuracy and stability (typical drift is less than 0.002°C per year). The SBE 39 communicates directly with a computer via a standard RA-232 interface.

  Temperature (°C) Pressure (optional)
Measurement Range -5 to +35 0 to full scale range: 20 / 100 / 350 / 1000 / 2000 / 3500 / 7000 metres
Pressure expressed in metres of deployment depth capability
Initial Accuracy 0.002 0.1% of full scale range
Typical Stability (per month) 0.0002 0.004% of full scale range
Resolution 0.0001 0.002% of full scale range
Sensor Calibration -1 to + 32 Ambient pressure to full scale range in 5 steps
Memory 4M byte non-volatile FLASH memory
Data Storage Converted temperature: 3 bytes per sample
Time: 4 bytes per sample
Pressure(optional): 2 bytes per sample
Real-Time Clock Watch-crystal type 32,768 Hz; Accuracy 5 seconds/month
Internal Battery Standard: 9 volt non-hazardous lithium battery
Optional: 9-volt alkaline transistor battery
Materials Standard: Celcon plastic pressure case rated at 350 metres
Optional: Titanium pressure case rated at 10500 metres

Further information can be found via the following link Official Seabird Website .

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) Celtic Deep SmartBuoy moored temperature chain SBE39 data: BODC processing

The data were delivered to BODC within a large matlab stucture containing data collected from each instrument on each deployment of the mooring. The data were transfered to BODC's internal NetCDF format. The following table shows the mapping of originators variables to appropriate BODC parameter codes:

Originator's Variable Originator's Units BODC Parameter Code BODC Units Comment
Temperature °C TEMPPR01 °C
Pressure dbar PREXPR01 dbar

The reformatted data were visualised using the in-house EDSERPLO software. Suspect data were marked by adding an appropriate quality control flag, missing data by both setting the data to an appropriate value and setting the quality control flag.

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) Celtic Deep SmartBuoy moored temperature chain data: Originators processing

SmartBuoy setup

CEFAS has many long term SmartBuoy moorings active in the global ocean. For the Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry Project the Celtic Deep SmartBuoy was augmented with a string of temperature loggers (supplied and managed by the National Oceanography Centre) that were nominally suspended between 10 m and 74 m depth. This near continuous dataset covered from 23/3/14 to 15/8/15, nearing 17 months. The six temperature loggers were deployed on the chain and log the temperature every 5 minutes, Sea-Bird SBE 39 temperature and pressure loggers were positioned at the top and bottom on the chain to calculate actual depth, Sea-Bird SBE 56 temperature recorders were positioned at various depths between them. The instruments on the chain were serviced five times by various cruises leading to 6 sampling periods.

The data processing on the temperature and pressure loggers for the Celtic Deep CEFAS SmartBuoy temperature chain was done in Matlab.

The data were plotted to see when the instruments were settled to get reliable observations for processing. The depths of the instruments were finalised with reference to the pressure instruments when possible. Periods 4 and 6 only had 1 pressure logger, ?SBE 39 T+P SN6761? for these periods the difference between the nominal depth and the mean-depth of ?SBE 39 T+P SN6761? was applied to the rest of the nominal depths. Both periods 1 and 3 had both pressure loggers, ?SBE 39 T+P SN6761? and ?SBE 39 T+P SN6762?, present at the top and bottom of the chain respectively. The mean depth of the pressure loggers were used as the absolute top and bottom of the chain. From these absolute values a line with a spacing of 5 steps in-between these values was used to replicate near 10 metre gaps. The 50 m approximate mark was discounted due to the nominal 20 m gap between SBE 56 T SN3592 and SBE 56 T SN3596 though was included so this different change in depth spacing did not affect other instruments. These values were then taken as the depths of the corresponding instruments without pressure sensors. Period 5 had no pressure loggers present and occurred in the winter mixed regime of the shelf sea so had few temperature structures for comparison in adjacent periods. Due to this nominal depths were taken as true depths.

Calibration procedures

The extracted data were looked over to identify areas that could be erroneous and a stability test was done to see times when lower instruments were warmer than the instruments above. It was felt that due to the extreme accuracy of the instruments that removal of certain data points that might seem erroneous would only degrade the data. The stability test however showed that often during periods with a mixed winter regime there was near continual instability present in the water column. With box plots of winter mixed periods often showing medians between instruments as positive (showing the deeper instrument recorded warmer temperatures). This suggested that the instruments were over-reading or under-reading the temperature of the mixed water. To see if this seeming error in temperature logging could be quantified multiple intervals where the observed water column was fully mixed, were examined to see if a realistic and accurate adjustment could be found. Based on the differences between the instruments to an instrument assumed to be reading the true temperature at these fully mixed periods lines of regression were drawn. The instrument at nominal depth of 20 m was decided to be the most accurate so was taken to be the ?true? instrument. This instrument was chosen as the only CTD taken around the winter mixed period, cast 15 on cruise DY021, had less temperature difference with the 20 m nominal instrument compared to the other instruments. The lines of regression with significant p values that provided a better fix than a constant (p-value around or less than 0.05) were applied to the relevant instrument while instruments without statistically significant p values had a mean of the differences applied.

Nominal Depth (m) R2 statistic F statistic p Value Estimate of Error Variance
10 0.290688 10.24541 0.0003708 1.39*10-07
30 0.717338 76.13378 9.90*10-10 1.13*10-07
40 0.729434 80.87879 5.10*10-10 4.68*10-07
60 0.103694 3.470719 0.072282 1.42*10-06
74 0.414991 3.546875 0.118372 3.81*10-07

The method fixed many of the smaller instabilities suggested by the data and brought the instruments in line with each other during the winter mixed periods. The adjustments meant the median difference between the instruments at the sampled times fell into the accuracy range given by the manufacturer.

Several issues were encountered with regards to calibration of the instruments against CTD casts leading to a state where no reliable calibration could be applied to the dataset. The offsets between the brand new SBE loggers and nearby CTD casts were highly variable and no statistically significant regression could be fitted, even after problem casts had been removed such as the CEFAS calibration CTDs taken during the CEFAS 22/14 cruise which used a backup ESM2 instrument as the main CTD was not in operation. The ESM2 instrument was reading approximately 0.5°C too high. Many of the comparison points also fall a long way outside the manufacturer?s accuracy and stability estimates for the temperature sensors - ±0.002°C and 0.0002°C/month respectively (http://www.seabird.com/sbe56-temperature-logger andhttp://www.seabird.com/sbe39plus-temperature-recorder). Some of the disagreement between the calibration CTD casts and the instruments could be explained due to the distance between the SmartBuoy and the cast locations. The tidal excursion for 6.2 hours (a rough calculation based on non-quality controlled ADCP data) showed that some of the calibration casts could have been half an M2 neaps tidal signature away from the SmartBuoy. Based on changes in deeper instruments temperature, less exposed to surface heating, over this 6 hour period temperature could change by 0.065°C. Though a possible explanation for the CTD instrument differences, the calculations were based on rough estimations and not adjusted for. Based on the new instruments and the reliability of Sea-Bird instruments it is likely any adjustments against the CTD casts would have degraded the quality and accuracy of the results


Project Information

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) Programme

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (SSB) is a £10.5 million, six-year (2011-2017) research programme, jointly funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). The aim of the research is to reduce the uncertainty in our understanding of nutrient and carbon cycling within the shelf seas, and of their role in global biogeochemical cycles. SSB will also provide effective policy advice and make a significant contribution to the Living with Environmental Change programme.

Background

The Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry research programme directly relates to the delivery of the NERC Earth system science theme and aims to provide evidence that supports a number of marine policy areas and statutory requirements, such as the Marine Strategy Framework Directive and Marine and Climate Acts.

The shelf seas are highly productive compared to the open ocean, a productivity that underpins more than 90 per cent of global fisheries. Their importance to society extends beyond food production to include issues of biodiversity, carbon cycling and storage, waste disposal, nutrient cycling, recreation and renewable energy resources.

The shelf seas have been estimated to be the most valuable biome on Earth, but they are under considerable stress, as a result of anthropogenic nutrient loading, overfishing, habitat disturbance, climate change and other impacts.

However, even within the relatively well-studied European shelf seas, fundamental biogeochemical processes are poorly understood. For example: the role of shelf seas in carbon storage; in the global cycles of key nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, silicon and iron); and in determining primary and secondary production, and thereby underpinning the future delivery of many other ecosystem services.

Improved knowledge of such factors is not only required by marine policymakers; it also has the potential to increase the quality and cost-effectiveness of management decisions at the local, national and international levels under conditions of climate change.

The Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry research programme will take a holistic approach to the cycling of nutrients and carbon and the controls on primary and secondary production in UK and European shelf seas, to increase understanding of these processes and their role in wider biogeochemical cycles. It will thereby significantly improve predictive marine biogeochemical and ecosystem models over a range of scales.

The scope of the programme includes exchanges with the open ocean (transport on and off the shelf to a depth of around 500m), together with cycling, storage and release processes on the shelf slope, and air-sea exchange of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide).

Further details are available on the SSB website.

Participants

15 different organisations are directly involved in research for SSB. These institutions are

  • Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas)
  • Meteorological Office
  • National Oceanography Centre (NOC)
  • Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML)
  • Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) / Scottish Marine Institute (SMI)
  • University of Aberdeen
  • University of Bangor
  • University of East Anglia (UEA)
  • University of Edinburgh
  • University of Essex
  • University of Liverpool
  • University of Oxford
  • Plymouth University
  • University of Portsmouth
  • University of Southampton

In addition, there are third party institutions carrying out sampling work for SSB, but who are not involved in the programme itself. These are:

  • The Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI)
  • Irish Marine Institute (MI)
  • Marine Science Scotland (MSS)

Research details

Overall, five Work Packages have been funded by the SSB programme. These are described in brief below:

  • Work Package 1: Carbon and Nutrient Dynamics and Fluxes over Shelf Systems (CaNDyFloSS).
    This work package aims to perform a comprehensive study of the cycling of nutrients and carbon throughout the water column over the whole north-west European shelf. This will allow the fluxes of nutrients and carbon between the shelf and the deep ocean and atmosphere to be quantified, establishing the role of the north-west European continental shelf in the global carbon cycle.

  • Work Package 2: Biogeochemistry, macronutrient and carbon cycling in the benthic layer.
    This work package aims are to map the sensitivity and status of seabed habitats, based on physical conditions, ecological community structure and the size and dynamics of the nitrogen and carbon pools found there. This information will be used, in conjunction with some laboratory-based work, to generate an understanding of the potential impacts on the benthic community as a result of changing environmental conditions, such as rising CO2 levels.

  • Work Package 3: The supply of iron from shelf sediments to the ocean.
    The research for this work package addresses the question of how currents, tides, weather and marine chemistry allow new iron to be transported away from the shallow shelf waters around the United Kingdom (UK), to the nearby open ocean. This will ultimately allow an improved understanding of how the transport of iron in shelf waters and shelf sediments influences phytoplankton growth in open oceans. This in turn improves the understanding of carbon dioxide uptake by phytoplankton.

  • Work Package 4: Integrative modelling for Shelf Seas Biogeochemistry.
    The aim of this work package is the development of a new shelf seas biogeochemical model system, coupled to a state of the art physical model, that is capable of predicting regional impacts of environmental change of timescales from days to decades. It is envisaged that the combination of predictive tools and new knowledge developed in this work package will underpin development and implementation of marine policy and marine forecasting systems.

  • Work Package 5: Data synthesis and management of marine and coastal carbon (DSMMAC).
    This work package is funded by Defra and is also known by the name 'Blue Carbon'. The aim is to provide a process-based, quantitative assessment of the role of UK coastal waters and shelf seas in carbon storage and release, using existing data and understanding, and also emerging results from SSB fieldwork, experiments and modelling. Particular emphasis will be given to processes that may be influenced by human activities, and hence the opportunity for management interventions to enhance carbon sequestration.

Fieldwork and data collection

The campaign consists of the core cruises in the table below, to the marine shelf (and shelf-edge) of the Celtic Sea on board the NERC research vessels RRS Discovery and RRS James Cook. These cruises will focus on the physics and biogeochemistry of the benthic and pelagic zones of the water column, primarily around four main sampling sites in this area.

Cruise identifier Research ship Cruise dates Work packages
DY008 RRS Discovery March 2014 WP 2 and WP 3
JC105 RRS James Cook June 2014 WP 1, WP 2 and WP 3
DY026 RRS Discovery August 2014 WP1, WP 2 and WP 3
DY018 RRS Discovery November - December 2014 WP 1 and WP 3
DY021 (also known as DY008b) RRS Discovery March 2015 WP 2 and WP 3
DY029 RRS Discovery April 2015 WP 1 and WP 3
DY030 RRS Discovery May 2015 WP 2 and WP 3
DY033 RRS Discovery July 2015 WP 1 and WP 3
DY034 RRS Discovery August 2015 WP 2 and WP 3

Core cruises will be supplemented by partner cruises led by Cefas, MI, MSS, Bangor University and AFBI, spanning the shelf seas and shelf-edges around United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland.

Activities will include coring, Conductivity Temperature and Depth (CTD) deployments, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) surveys, moorings and wire-walker deployments, benthic lander observatories, autonomous gliders and submersible surveys, Marine Snow Catcher particulate matter analysis, plankton net hauls, in-situ sediment flume investigations and laboratory incubations with core and sea water samples.


Data Activity or Cruise Information

Data Activity

Start Date (yyyy-mm-dd) 2015-05-09
End Date (yyyy-mm-dd) 2015-08-15
Organization Undertaking ActivityNational Oceanography Centre, Liverpool
Country of OrganizationUnited Kingdom
Originator's Data Activity IdentifierTEMP_CHAIN_DY030_201505
Platform Categorysubsurface mooring

SSB Celtic Deep SmartBuoy temperature chain DY030 201505

For the Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry Project the Celtic Deep SmartBuoy (longitude -6.56748 and latitude of 51.13732) was augmented with a string of temperature loggers that were nominally suspended between 10 m and 74 m depth in a nominal water depth of 99 m.

Deployment Recovery
Cruise RRS Discovery DY030 RRS Discovery DY034
Date 09/05/2015 13:51:00 15/08/2015 13:00:00

Instruments deployed on the rig

Depth Instrument
11m SBE 39 T+P (SN6761)
21m SBE 56 T (SN3593)
31m SBE 56 T (SN3590)
41m SBE 56 T (SN3592)
61m SBE 56 T (SN3596)

Related Data Activity activities are detailed in Appendix 1

Cruise

Cruise Name DY030
Departure Date 2015-05-04
Arrival Date 2015-05-25
Principal Scientist(s)Gary Fones (University of Southampton School of Ocean and Earth Science)
Ship RRS Discovery

Complete Cruise Metadata Report is available here


Fixed Station Information

Fixed Station Information

Station NameShelf Seas Biogeochemistry Fixed Station Celtic Deep
CategoryOffshore area
Latitude51° 8.26' N
Longitude6° 36.35' W
Water depth below MSL104.0 m

Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry Fixed Station Celtic Deep

This station is one of four mooring sites located on the continental shelf of the Celtic Sea and maintained during the Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry project. The station has a mean water depth 104 m at the following co-ordinates:

Box Corner Latitude Longitude
North-west corner 51.1570° -6.6494°
South-east corner 51.1182° -6.5622°

The position of this station relative to the other Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry sites can be seen from the figure below.

BODC image

Sampling History

DY008 JC105 DY026 DY018
CTD casts 2 2 22 -
STD casts - 1 - -
Zooplankton net hauls - - 19 -
Box cores - - 4 -
Marine snow catcher - - 29 -
Stand Alone Pump Systems (SAPS) - - 1 -
PML Drifter Buoy - - 3 -

Mooring deployments

Latitude Longitude Water depth (m) Moored instrument Deployment date Recovery date Deployment cruise Recovery cruise Comments
51.1373° -6.5675° 99 Cefas SmartBuoy 23-03-2014 15:43 UTC 17-06-2014 14:24 UTC DY008 JC105 -
51.1376° -6.5672° 98 Cefas SmartBuoy 17-06-2014 16:56 UTC - JC105 - Not recovered on DY026B as planned - mooring was lost due to suspected trawler activity.
51.1383° -6.5706° 100 Cefas SmartBuoy 17-08-2014 17:11 UTC 23/10/2014 08:00 UTC DY026B CEFAS 22/14 -
51.1373° -6.5675° 99 Cefas SmartBuoy 23/10/2014 14:00 UTC 08/03/2015 17:20 UTC CEFAS 22/14 DY021 -
51.1372° -6.5684° 105 Cefas SmartBuoy 10/03/2015 07:46 UTC 08/05/2015 10:45 UTC DY021 DY030 -
51.1373° -6.5673° 100 Cefas SmartBuoy 09/05/2015 13:52 UTC 15/08/2015 13:00 UTC DY030 DY034 -

Related Fixed Station activities are detailed in Appendix 2


BODC Quality Control Flags

The following single character qualifying flags may be associated with one or more individual parameters with a data cycle:

Flag Description
Blank Unqualified
< Below detection limit
> In excess of quoted value
A Taxonomic flag for affinis (aff.)
B Beginning of CTD Down/Up Cast
C Taxonomic flag for confer (cf.)
D Thermometric depth
E End of CTD Down/Up Cast
G Non-taxonomic biological characteristic uncertainty
H Extrapolated value
I Taxonomic flag for single species (sp.)
K Improbable value - unknown quality control source
L Improbable value - originator's quality control
M Improbable value - BODC quality control
N Null value
O Improbable value - user quality control
P Trace/calm
Q Indeterminate
R Replacement value
S Estimated value
T Interpolated value
U Uncalibrated
W Control value
X Excessive difference

SeaDataNet Quality Control Flags

The following single character qualifying flags may be associated with one or more individual parameters with a data cycle:

Flag Description
0 no quality control
1 good value
2 probably good value
3 probably bad value
4 bad value
5 changed value
6 value below detection
7 value in excess
8 interpolated value
9 missing value
A value phenomenon uncertain
B nominal value
Q value below limit of quantification

Appendix 1: TEMP_CHAIN_DY030_201505

Related series for this Data Activity are presented in the table below. Further information can be found by following the appropriate links.

If you are interested in these series, please be aware we offer a multiple file download service. Should your credentials be insufficient for automatic download, the service also offers a referral to our Enquiries Officer who may be able to negotiate access.

Series IdentifierData CategoryStart date/timeStart positionCruise
1905823Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030
1905835Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030
1905847Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030
1905859Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030

Appendix 2: Shelf Seas Biogeochemistry Fixed Station Celtic Deep

Related series for this Fixed Station are presented in the table below. Further information can be found by following the appropriate links.

If you are interested in these series, please be aware we offer a multiple file download service. Should your credentials be insufficient for automatic download, the service also offers a referral to our Enquiries Officer who may be able to negotiate access.

Series IdentifierData CategoryStart date/timeStart positionCruise
1371512CTD or STD cast2014-03-23 08:51:0051.12823 N, 6.56232 WRRS Discovery DY008
1336643Water sample data2014-03-23 08:51:0051.12825 N, 6.56222 WRRS Discovery DY008
1905638Hydrography time series at depth2014-03-23 15:44:5951.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY008
1905651Hydrography time series at depth2014-03-23 15:44:5951.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY008
1905663Hydrography time series at depth2014-03-23 15:44:5951.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY008
1905675Hydrography time series at depth2014-03-23 15:44:5951.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY008
1905571Hydrography time series at depth2014-03-23 15:45:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY008
1905583Hydrography time series at depth2014-03-23 15:45:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY008
1371524CTD or STD cast2014-03-23 16:22:0051.13792 N, 6.56963 WRRS Discovery DY008
1336655Water sample data2014-03-23 16:23:0051.13793 N, 6.56965 WRRS Discovery DY008
1372693CTD or STD cast2014-06-17 12:35:0051.14018 N, 6.5659 WRRS James Cook JC105
2103798Water sample data2014-06-17 12:41:3051.14017 N, 6.56595 WRRS James Cook JC105
2108059Water sample data2014-06-17 12:41:3051.14017 N, 6.56595 WRRS James Cook JC105
2143069Water sample data2014-06-17 12:41:3051.14017 N, 6.56595 WRRS James Cook JC105
1372700CTD or STD cast2014-06-17 17:22:0051.13899 N, 6.56501 WRRS James Cook JC105
2103805Water sample data2014-06-17 17:24:3051.13894 N, 6.56515 WRRS James Cook JC105
2108060Water sample data2014-06-17 17:24:3051.13894 N, 6.56515 WRRS James Cook JC105
2143070Water sample data2014-06-17 17:24:3051.13894 N, 6.56515 WRRS James Cook JC105
1373094CTD or STD cast2014-08-09 06:08:0051.13767 N, 6.586 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127555Water sample data2014-08-09 06:21:3051.13774 N, 6.58583 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373101CTD or STD cast2014-08-09 10:40:0051.12067 N, 6.62167 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2118171Water sample data2014-08-09 10:54:0051.11972 N, 6.62294 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127567Water sample data2014-08-09 10:54:0051.11972 N, 6.62294 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373113CTD or STD cast2014-08-09 13:30:0051.11833 N, 6.62533 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127579Water sample data2014-08-09 14:30:0051.11833 N, 6.62499 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373125CTD or STD cast2014-08-09 16:04:0051.11833 N, 6.62533 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127580Water sample data2014-08-09 16:20:3051.11833 N, 6.62498 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373137CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 06:58:0051.157 N, 6.57133 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127592Water sample data2014-08-10 07:10:3051.15702 N, 6.57108 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373149CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 08:00:0051.15633 N, 6.57533 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127611Water sample data2014-08-10 08:15:0051.15656 N, 6.57279 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373150CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 08:59:0051.15567 N, 6.5775 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127623Water sample data2014-08-10 09:10:0051.15501 N, 6.57861 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373162CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 10:00:0051.15283 N, 6.58967 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127635Water sample data2014-08-10 10:08:3051.15174 N, 6.59221 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373174CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 11:03:0051.1495 N, 6.5985 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2118183Water sample data2014-08-10 11:14:0051.14896 N, 6.59987 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127647Water sample data2014-08-10 11:14:0051.14896 N, 6.59987 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373186CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 12:04:0051.14767 N, 6.60333 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127659Water sample data2014-08-10 12:10:0051.14731 N, 6.60372 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373198CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 12:59:0051.14667 N, 6.60533 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127660Water sample data2014-08-10 13:09:0051.14626 N, 6.60576 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373205CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 13:59:0051.14583 N, 6.60667 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127672Water sample data2014-08-10 14:10:0051.14579 N, 6.6065 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373217CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 15:08:0051.14567 N, 6.60667 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127684Water sample data2014-08-10 15:19:0051.14574 N, 6.60586 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373229CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 16:10:0051.14567 N, 6.60533 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127696Water sample data2014-08-10 16:17:0051.14564 N, 6.60417 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373230CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 17:00:0051.14567 N, 6.60417 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127703Water sample data2014-08-10 17:12:3051.14569 N, 6.60394 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373242CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 17:57:0051.14567 N, 6.60417 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127715Water sample data2014-08-10 18:09:3051.14568 N, 6.60394 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373254CTD or STD cast2014-08-10 19:06:0051.14567 N, 6.60417 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127727Water sample data2014-08-10 19:15:0051.14568 N, 6.60394 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373291CTD or STD cast2014-08-12 07:00:0051.1485 N, 6.60417 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127740Water sample data2014-08-12 07:10:3051.14853 N, 6.60395 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373309CTD or STD cast2014-08-12 11:00:0051.13983 N, 6.622 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2118195Water sample data2014-08-12 11:14:0051.13963 N, 6.62276 WRRS Discovery DY026A
2127752Water sample data2014-08-12 11:14:0051.13963 N, 6.62276 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373310CTD or STD cast2014-08-12 13:26:0051.137 N, 6.6295 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1373322CTD or STD cast2014-08-12 18:00:0051.135 N, 6.63333 WRRS Discovery DY026A
1905687Hydrography time series at depth2014-08-17 17:14:5951.1383 N, 6.57057 WRRS Discovery DY026B
1905699Hydrography time series at depth2014-08-17 17:14:5951.1383 N, 6.57057 WRRS Discovery DY026B
1905706Hydrography time series at depth2014-08-17 17:14:5951.1383 N, 6.57057 WRRS Discovery DY026B
1905718Hydrography time series at depth2014-08-17 17:14:5951.1383 N, 6.57057 WRRS Discovery DY026B
1905595Hydrography time series at depth2014-08-17 17:15:0051.1383 N, 6.57057 WRRS Discovery DY026B
1905602Hydrography time series at depth2014-08-17 17:15:0051.1383 N, 6.57057 WRRS Discovery DY026B
1373346CTD or STD cast2014-08-17 17:31:0051.13998 N, 6.5793 WRRS Discovery DY026B
2127776Water sample data2014-08-17 17:40:3051.13991 N, 6.57931 WRRS Discovery DY026B
1905614Hydrography time series at depth2014-10-23 14:00:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRV Cefas Endeavour 22/14
1905731Hydrography time series at depth2014-10-23 14:00:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRV Cefas Endeavour 22/14
1905743Hydrography time series at depth2014-10-23 14:00:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRV Cefas Endeavour 22/14
1905755Hydrography time series at depth2014-10-23 14:00:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRV Cefas Endeavour 22/14
1905767Hydrography time series at depth2014-10-23 14:00:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRV Cefas Endeavour 22/14
1905779Hydrography time series at depth2015-03-10 07:48:0951.1372 N, 6.5684 WRRS Discovery DY021
1905780Hydrography time series at depth2015-03-10 07:49:5951.1372 N, 6.5684 WRRS Discovery DY021
1905792Hydrography time series at depth2015-03-10 07:49:5951.1372 N, 6.5684 WRRS Discovery DY021
1905811Hydrography time series at depth2015-03-10 07:49:5951.1372 N, 6.5684 WRRS Discovery DY021
2127242Water sample data2015-03-10 12:30:3051.13352 N, 6.57524 WRRS Discovery DY021
2135856Water sample data2015-03-10 12:30:3051.13352 N, 6.57524 WRRS Discovery DY021
2132385Water sample data2015-05-08 08:41:3051.14138 N, 6.57319 WRRS Discovery DY030
1905823Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030
1905835Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030
1905847Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030
1905859Hydrography time series at depth2015-05-09 14:20:0051.13732 N, 6.56748 WRRS Discovery DY030
1624713CTD or STD cast2015-05-09 17:03:0051.13798 N, 6.55718 WRRS Discovery DY030
1721335CTD or STD cast2015-08-12 11:52:0051.12317 N, 6.57627 WRRS Discovery DY034